The McLook rugby collection

A personal collection that tells the story of Springbok rugby

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115 Comments

Reply Simon Kneebone
3:36 AM on April 2, 2011 
Love the site; great videos and commentaries.
Reply McLook
4:34 PM on April 6, 2011 
Simon Kneebone says...
Love the site; great videos and commentaries.
Thanks Simon and welcome. Lots more to come in terms of video material and game reports.
Reply 3 colours
8:45 AM on June 13, 2011 
Since the time that I was looking for a site! I me regia! Thank you McLook
Reply All Blacks 1996
5:50 AM on June 19, 2011 
This site is a wonderful archive of rugby's greatest rivalry. Bring back the long tours, and warm up by thrashing Oz! Bring back the biff as well.
Reply McLook
6:37 AM on June 19, 2011 
All Blacks 1996 says...
This site is a wonderful archive of rugby's greatest rivalry. Bring back the long tours, and warm up by thrashing Oz! Bring back the biff as well.
Agree. These long tours was something else and I would love to see it back. Reality is it is not as profitable as S15 and Tri-nations. But hey we can have a yarn about the old days and read and watch some pictures of the old heroes on Sunday when we have nothing else to do. Welcome I am sure you'll find my current topic (the 1956 tour) interesting reading. I try and post a new piece every weekend. The next one will be about the Waikato game which had a significant impact on the tour.
Reply All Blacks 1996
7:19 AM on June 19, 2011 
McLook says...
Agree. These long tours was something else and I would love to see it back. Reality is it is not as profitable as S15 and Tri-nations. But hey we can have a yarn about the old days and read and watch some pictures of the old heroes on Sunday when we have nothing else to do. Welcome I am sure you'll find my current topic (the 1956 tour) interesting reading. I try and post a new piece every weekend. The next one will be about the Waikato game which had a significant impact on the tour.
Reply All Blacks 1996
7:22 AM on June 19, 2011 
Unfortunately rugby is now in the hands of sponsors and multi national media interests, which are infringing on the cultural soul of the game, and corrupting our national identity and sporting values. Commercialism is threatening to make the final cut from the Corinthian values that have defined rugby. If rugby is reduced to a franchised branch of the entertainment industry by australian media interests, its social significance in our country will decline. When domestic and international rugby becomes a media managed experience, the connection between players and the public is not as close as it has historically been in our countries. The sense of us all having a stake in our team is replaced by the players need to justify their money, rather than the team expressing our hopes and collective desire with the ball. To beat the All Blacks, or the Springboks we need players that do not do it just for the money.
Reply McLook
7:00 AM on June 20, 2011 
All Blacks 1996 says...
Unfortunately rugby is now in the hands of sponsors and multi national media interests, which are infringing on the cultural soul of the game, and corrupting our national identity and sporting values. Commercialism is threatening to make the final cut from the Corinthian values that have defined rugby. If rugby is reduced to a franchised branch of the entertainment industry by australian media interests, its social significance in our country will decline. When domestic and international rugby becomes a media managed experience, the connection between players and the public is not as close as it has historically been in our countries. The sense of us all having a stake in our team is replaced by the players need to justify their money, rather than the team expressing our hopes and collective desire with the ball. To beat the All Blacks, or the Springboks we need players that do not do it just for the money.
Well said; can't agree with you more. I see the NZ players (S15 and AB) make quite and effort to mingle with the crowds after matches. I don't, however, think that is enough. You need your Springboks and All Blacks to play a few club games and to exert their knowledge and influence to club players. People in Palmerston North and Wanganui will go and watch club matches if they know one of the All Blacks are playing. I can still remeber my excitement cycling on my bike in Mafikeng as a 12 year old to the Wouter de Vos staduim to go and watch Piet Visagie play for Amazol against Mafikeng in 1973. The whole town was their to see Piet Visagie and his team mates who won the Currie Cup for Griquas in 1970. For the next two weeks that was all that we as kids talked about during rugby practice and during lunch breaks at school mimicing Visagie's passes and kicks.
Reply All Blacks 1996
7:25 AM on June 20, 2011 
Rugby's appeal, traditions, intrinsic qualities of contact, movement, fluidity, combat, and direct personal expression, still have the power to create communities filled with interest, passion and desire. If ever the laws of nature were embodied in a game, rugby played well is the illustration. Rugby has played a key part in shaping the type of people New Zealanders are today. Our greatest rugby players have provided our nation with a brilliant reflection of ourselves. Rugby players that represented provinces were standard bearers. This was achieved by an aristocracy of sporting talent that lived, worked, and played amongst us. In small communities, it was rugby that had an extraordinary capacity to focus loyalty and belonging. Today a marketing franchise, or re-branding campaign cannot come close to matching this. It is essential to the future of the game that grassroots rugby in the heartland of NZ should be preserved. New Zealand has always represented a concentrated conveyor belt of natural rugby talent coupled with visionary coaching from unpaid volunteers in rural communities, and school playgrounds.
Reply McLook
8:12 AM on June 20, 2011 
All Blacks 1996 says...
Rugby's appeal, traditions, intrinsic qualities of contact, movement, fluidity, combat, and direct personal expression, still have the power to create communities filled with interest, passion and desire. If ever the laws of nature were embodied in a game, rugby played well is the illustration. Rugby has played a key part in shaping the type of people New Zealanders are today. Our greatest rugby players have provided our nation with a brilliant reflection of ourselves. Rugby players that represented provinces were standard bearers. This was achieved by an aristocracy of sporting talent that lived, worked, and played amongst us. In small communities, it was rugby that had an extraordinary capacity to focus loyalty and belonging. Today a marketing franchise, or re-branding campaign cannot come close to matching this. It is essential to the future of the game that grassroots rugby in the heartland of NZ should be preserved. New Zealand has always represented a concentrated conveyor belt of natural rugby talent coupled with visionary coaching from unpaid volunteers in rural communities, and school playgrounds.
Well said, again. In 1920 when tha Afrikaners took power in South Africa they targeted rugby to give the Afrikaners as sense of belonging and pride. It was also the first Springboks touring to the UK in 1900 who united the Afrikaans and English speaking communities after the Anglo boer war. It was rugby that united the rainbow nation (black and white) in 1995 when we won the WC. I know NZ is still lameting food tampering and whatever but I do believe there is some appreciation in NZ of what that won meant for South Africa as a country. Just like the AB needed a series won more than the South Africans in 1956 so SA needed something to pul the nation together in 1995. Rugby is part of the our DNA just like it is here in NZ and you are abolutely right it is essential in both countries that rugby stay healthy at grassroots level. I see to many kids not wanting to play rugby anymore or who start crying when you give them a bit of a fitness work-out at practice or whose parents starts complaining when the coach gets a bit vocal with them. It is not the communities and grastoots rugby who are benefitting from the rugby anymore it is the TV companies and rugby administrators and the top 10% players. The rest of the nation is slowly but surely starting to withdraw from the sport.