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Scud
Member
Posts: 26

Does anyone have any games on DVD/video of the 1976 & 1981 series? I have 1000s of games from the 1960s-present, that may interest some people.

August 4, 2013 at 3:28 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Scud
Member
Posts: 26

I'm interested in tour games also. If there are any members out there, that have been chasing a certain game  - let me know what game and I'll see if I have it

August 4, 2013 at 3:41 AM Flag Quote & Reply

All Blacks 1996
Member
Posts: 160

Do you have Scotland v NZ 1981 at Eden Park??

--

Philip


August 4, 2013 at 5:19 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Scud
Member
Posts: 26

Hi Philip

Yes, I have that game. The problem is, most of my older games are back in NZ. I'll be back there in 3 months, so I'll get a copy for you if you like, when I go back. Not a problem!

August 4, 2013 at 9:11 AM Flag Quote & Reply

McLook
Site Owner
Posts: 134

Scud at August 4, 2013 at 3:28 AM

Does anyone have any games on DVD/video of the 1976 & 1981 series? I have 1000s of games from the 1960s-present, that may interest some people.

There are video's/dvd's availble that shows highlights of the 1976 and 1981 test matches. I have some highlights of 1981 tour matches; which I will try and post within the next couple of weeks. I am currently in process to try and find more video matrial of the 1981 and 1976 tour matches.

Some of the video material of the 1976 test matches can be found on this website. If you want the dvd with highlights of the 4 test matches I can provide you with the name of the website. But have a look most of those material are already on this website.

In terms of the video material of matches since 1960. I'll be very keen to get material of the 1960 All Black tour (test matches and tour matches). Also of the 1962, 1968 amd 1980 Lions tours. I am particularly keen to get material of the tour matches. I have some material (on this webste) of the first three test matches of the 1980 tour but virtually nothing on the tour matches.

I have highlights (to be seen on this website) of the 1970 test matches but nothing on the tour matches.

Lastly material of the 1975 French tour to South Africa would just make my day.

August 6, 2013 at 4:11 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Flourbomber
Member
Posts: 104

All Blacks 1996 at August 4, 2013 at 5:19 AM

Do you have Scotland v NZ 1981 at Eden Park??

No, but I was there.

August 6, 2013 at 4:13 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Flourbomber
Member
Posts: 104

McLook at August 6, 2013 at 4:11 AM

Scud at August 4, 2013 at 3:28 AM

Does anyone have any games on DVD/video of the 1976 & 1981 series? I have 1000s of games from the 1960s-present, that may interest some people.

There are video's/dvd's availble that shows highlights of the 1976 and 1981 test matches. I have some highlights of 1981 tour matches; which I will try and post within the next couple of weeks. I am currently in process to try and find more video matrial of the 1981 and 1976 tour matches.

Some of the video material of the 1976 test matches can be found on this website. If you want the dvd with highlights of the 4 test matches I can provide you with the name of the website. But have a look most of those material are already on this website.

In terms of the video material of matches since 1960. I'll be very keen to get material of the 1960 All Black tour (test matches and tour matches). Also of the 1962, 1968 amd 1980 Lions tours. I am particularly keen to get material of the tour matches. I have some material (on this webste) of the first three test matches of the 1980 tour but virtually nothing on the tour matches.

I have highlights (to be seen on this website) of the 1970 test matches but nothing on the tour matches.

Lastly material of the 1975 French tour to South Africa would just make my day.

Any of coverage of the Quaqqa Barbarians and Transvaal games of 76?

August 6, 2013 at 4:14 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Kimbo
Member
Posts: 219

Flourbomber at August 6, 2013 at 4:13 PM

All Blacks 1996 at August 4, 2013 at 5:19 AM

Do you have Scotland v NZ 1981 at Eden Park??

No, but I was there.

That was a good game to be at!

And a fine way for the great BJ Robertson to hang up his boots for the All Blacks. From memory Stu Wilson gave him a pass to score in the last minute, rather than holding on and scoring his 4th try of the day.

Which was only fair, because Bruce Roberston had been timing his passes to wingers like Wilson, Bryan Williams, and Grant Batty for years. They were all great wingers, and I think they may have scored about 150 tries in all games for the All Blacks during their careers - with Bruce Roberston as the guy who was usually there sweetly timing the passes for them they were even greater.

Bruce Robertson's best ever "put-on-the after-burners" break of sheer pace was against the French at Paris in 1977 (after getting beaten up the week before the All Blacks had a game plan to speed it up, and oh how ell they did it. Mourie picking up the ball at halfway, biffing it in for  a quick lineout - wasn't the common tactic it is now- abd then blip-blip-blip along the line in no time to Roberston, then Stu Wilson, as he did so well, coming in for the pass on a chaneg of angle, and a 40 metre run like a knife through butter untouched under the post for a try). Although the break Roberston put in between Michael O'Connor and Michael Hawker from his own 22 in the second test in Brisbane in 1980 (crazy Eric watson didn't originally pick him, and he was only there as a late replacement) and 80 metres and 10 pairs of hands later Hika Reid is running in for the match-winning try. Magic!

I think only Joe Stanley matched BJ for passing skills/running in wingers (he helped make John Kirwan, Craig Green and Terry Wright the great try-scorers they were). Even though Joe played for Ponsonby and was also a great centre and was probably more rugged than BJ, I'd have to rate Robertson as a more complete centre - the pace, the chip, the partnership with Osborne.

August 6, 2013 at 10:36 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Flourbomber
Member
Posts: 104

Kimbo at August 6, 2013 at 10:36 PM

Flourbomber at August 6, 2013 at 4:13 PM

All Blacks 1996 at August 4, 2013 at 5:19 AM

Do you have Scotland v NZ 1981 at Eden Park??

No, but I was there.

That was a good game to be at!

And a fine way for the great BJ Robertson to hang up his boots for the All Blacks. From memory Stu Wilson gave him a pass to score in the last minute, rather than holding on and scoring his 4th try of the day.

Which was only fair, because Bruce Roberston had been timing his passes to wingers like Wilson, Bryan Williams, and Grant Batty for years. They were all great wingers, and I think they may have scored about 150 tries in all games for the All Blacks during their careers - with Bruce Roberston as the guy who was usually there sweetly timing the passes for them they were even greater.

Bruce Robertson's best ever "put-on-the after-burners" break of sheer pace was against the French at Paris in 1977 (after getting beaten up the week before the All Blacks had a game plan to speed it up, and oh how ell they did it. Mourie picking up the ball at halfway, biffing it in for  a quick lineout - wasn't the common tactic it is now- abd then blip-blip-blip along the line in no time to Roberston, then Stu Wilson, as he did so well, coming in for the pass on a chaneg of angle, and a 40 metre run like a knife through butter untouched under the post for a try). Although the break Roberston put in between Michael O'Connor and Michael Hawker from his own 22 in the second test in Brisbane in 1980 (crazy Eric watson didn't originally pick him, and he was only there as a late replacement) and 80 metres and 10 pairs of hands later Hika Reid is running in for the match-winning try. Magic!

I think only Joe Stanley matched BJ for passing skills/running in wingers (he helped make John Kirwan, Craig Green and Terry Wright the great try-scorers they were). Even though Joe played for Ponsonby and was also a great centre and was probably more rugged than BJ, I'd have to rate Robertson as a more complete centre - the pace, the chip, the partnership with Osborne.

and who can forget the last minute drop goal in the last minute of the 3rd test v the Lions in 77? Actually the All Blacks tried running it a lot that day and while they looked pretty creaky  - the intention was there.

The partnership with Osborne has never been bettered - Stanley rated Kurt Sherlock as a better partner - funny how Stanley played league and Sherlock went to league.

Check out Osborne in the World XV 1977 clip - kind of gets his timing wrong and Pottgeiter scores.

Pretty much on the same page with you rugbywise mate - I was pretty ambivalent about the 85 tour being cancelled and yes I read and read the 76 rugby yearbook too.

Mike


August 7, 2013 at 4:57 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Kimbo
Member
Posts: 219

Flourbomber at August 7, 2013 at 4:57 PM

Kimbo at August 6, 2013 at 10:36 PM

Flourbomber at August 6, 2013 at 4:13 PM

All Blacks 1996 at August 4, 2013 at 5:19 AM

Do you have Scotland v NZ 1981 at Eden Park??

No, but I was there.

That was a good game to be at!

And a fine way for the great BJ Robertson to hang up his boots for the All Blacks. From memory Stu Wilson gave him a pass to score in the last minute, rather than holding on and scoring his 4th try of the day.

Which was only fair, because Bruce Roberston had been timing his passes to wingers like Wilson, Bryan Williams, and Grant Batty for years. They were all great wingers, and I think they may have scored about 150 tries in all games for the All Blacks during their careers - with Bruce Roberston as the guy who was usually there sweetly timing the passes for them they were even greater.

Bruce Robertson's best ever "put-on-the after-burners" break of sheer pace was against the French at Paris in 1977 (after getting beaten up the week before the All Blacks had a game plan to speed it up, and oh how ell they did it. Mourie picking up the ball at halfway, biffing it in for  a quick lineout - wasn't the common tactic it is now- abd then blip-blip-blip along the line in no time to Roberston, then Stu Wilson, as he did so well, coming in for the pass on a chaneg of angle, and a 40 metre run like a knife through butter untouched under the post for a try). Although the break Roberston put in between Michael O'Connor and Michael Hawker from his own 22 in the second test in Brisbane in 1980 (crazy Eric watson didn't originally pick him, and he was only there as a late replacement) and 80 metres and 10 pairs of hands later Hika Reid is running in for the match-winning try. Magic!

I think only Joe Stanley matched BJ for passing skills/running in wingers (he helped make John Kirwan, Craig Green and Terry Wright the great try-scorers they were). Even though Joe played for Ponsonby and was also a great centre and was probably more rugged than BJ, I'd have to rate Robertson as a more complete centre - the pace, the chip, the partnership with Osborne.

and who can forget the last minute drop goal in the last minute of the 3rd test v the Lions in 77? Actually the All Blacks tried running it a lot that day and while they looked pretty creaky  - the intention was there.

The partnership with Osborne has never been bettered - Stanley rated Kurt Sherlock as a better partner - funny how Stanley played league and Sherlock went to league.

Check out Osborne in the World XV 1977 clip - kind of gets his timing wrong and Pottgeiter scores.

Pretty much on the same page with you rugbywise mate - I was pretty ambivalent about the 85 tour being cancelled and yes I read and read the 76 rugby yearbook too.

Mike


Yeah - Osborne was really a centre (outside centre for the rest of the world), not an 2nd five eighth (inside centre) at the start of his career, and it wasn't until about 1978 he had completely mastered the positional difference.

He still played well in 1977 though. Yes, we did win the third test against the 1977 Lions by running it - the Lions were demolishing us so badly up front (the 4th was even worse, where we sneaked in against the run of play) we had no other option than to run it. The test later that year in France was where they took the tactics a logical step further - don't even try and engage in the forward struggle, instead use the tackle ball area as a consolidating point for the forwards of  both teams in one place - then spread it wide again as fast as you can, and speed up the tempo with tap penalties and quick lineouts. Wallabies had been trying it for years, but it took a lot of humility for the All Black forwards that day to turn their backs on tradition, and concede the French were a tougher more physical pack, and this was one game where "you win a game by winning up front" just wasn't going to work.

That is an interesting comment about Stanley and Kurt Sherlock. I always thought that with respect to Sherlock, and then later Warwick Taylor with the All Blacks, Stanley's best centre partner was Johnny Schuster (who also had that marvellous combination with John Gallagher coming in from fullback).

In the mid-1980s, after playing earlier on a Saturday, my age-grade club team would sometimes go in to Eden Park to watch the senior games (best position was on the top of the No. 3 Western stand so you could alternate between the game on the No. 1 field, and then watch what was happening on No. 2 and 3 fields0. Johhny Schuster was playing fullback then for Marist, so along with Steven Pokere, his talents in midfield were not required for Auckland, even though they later proved outstanding for Wellington and the All Blacks. But fair enough - Sherlock fitted the pattern perfectly for Auckland - great wingers outside, ball playing loosies inside to support, so you wanted a no. 12 to straighten, pass, and be solid on D. The extra option of being able to make a break wasn't required.

When we had all those defections to League in 1990, I could handle Ridge, Botica, and even Gallagher going. But Johnny Schu was the one I really missed. He only played for a few years, and if he had gone to the World Cup in 1991 I think we would have won it and Schuster would rightly remembered in the wider public memory, along with Osborne and Little as the great All Black no. 12 he was.

In the 1991 semi-final the Wallabies defence drifted on us all day in that semi, knowing the injured Fox, the Sherlock-like feeder McCahill, and even Postie Innes crash balling at No. 13 weren't going to present any unexpected problems - and we had no injection of pace at fullback - so they could cut down space for our wingers all day. All it needed was the fear that the guy at No. 12 was going to step inside them, and they would have been kept honest.


August 7, 2013 at 7:58 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Kimbo
Member
Posts: 219

Just slightly off topic, but thinking about senior club rugby now compared to the mid-1980s in Auckland (which admittedly was a golden era, probably the most competitive and higest standard club competition in NZ rugby history).

Richie MCaw's comeback game for the Christchurch club a few weeks ago was big news and they got a big crowd because a great All Black was playing.

In 1985, you would have 6 senior club games played on the three Eden Park fields, and you could see, for a couple of dollars, and an (admittedly over-priced, cold, and nutritionally deficient) hot dog or pie the following players: -

Michael Jones and Lindsay Harris for Waitemata

Kurt Sherlock and Glen Rich for Suburbs

Andy Haden, Joe Stanley, and Mark Brooke-Cowden for Ponsonby (and a whole bunch of other club legends who wouldn't have disgraced a rep jersy - no club bias! :) - champions in 1985 against Marist who had 5 present or future All Blacks, and again, undefeated in 1986 including in the final against a Varsity team with 4 All Blacks!)

Alan and Gary Whetton for Grammar

David Kirk, Grant Fox, Sean Fitzpatrick, John Drake, Mata'afa Keenan and John McDermott for University

John Kirwan, Terry Wright, John Schuster, Bernie McCahill, Zinzan and Marty Brooke (Robin may still have been playing Under 21s then)

Steve Pokere and Steve McDowell for Pakuranga.

In 1986 they introduced the early season South Pacific championship (the first initial step towards today's Super XV), and it all started to change, and time to play club rugby diminished for rep players and All Blacks. But I can still remember as clear as day, standing a few feet from Steve McDowell as he was chatting to someone after coming off Eden Park No. 2 - no mobs, no autograph hunters, no TV cameras. He was a potential All Black with a big future, had just arrived up from the BOP (Auckland had business connections in those shamateur days, and the provinces were going into the rural down-turn courtesy of Roger Douglas' economic reforms).

One of my club mates still laughs about the time he was doing primitive video spy coverage, running up and down the sideline between the No. 2 and 3 fields at Eden Park filming Varsity, coached then by Ted Henry. Heny assumed he was the Varsity video man, rather than from Ponies, and was giving him a running commentary on where to pan in, and all the inside information and codes and moves he needed to make sure he was capturing. Can you imagine a coup like that happening in the professional era! :)

August 7, 2013 at 9:02 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Kimbo
Member
Posts: 219

Kimbo at August 7, 2013 at 9:02 PM

Just slightly off topic, but thinking about senior club rugby now compared to the mid-1980s in Auckland (which admittedly was a golden era, probably the most competitive and higest standard club competition in NZ rugby history).

Richie MCaw's comeback game for the Christchurch club a few weeks ago was big news and they got a big crowd because a great All Black was playing.

In 1985, you would have 6 senior club games played on the three Eden Park fields, and you could see, for a couple of dollars, and an (admittedly over-priced, cold, and nutritionally deficient) hot dog or pie the following players: -

Michael Jones and Lindsay Harris for Waitemata

Kurt Sherlock and Glen Rich for Suburbs

Andy Haden, Joe Stanley, and Mark Brooke-Cowden for Ponsonby (and a whole bunch of other club legends who wouldn't have disgraced a rep jersy - no club bias! :) - champions in 1985 against Marist who had 5 present or future All Blacks, and again, undefeated in 1986 including in the final against a Varsity team with 4 All Blacks!)

Alan and Gary Whetton for Grammar

David Kirk, Grant Fox, Sean Fitzpatrick, John Drake, Mata'afa Keenan and John McDermott for University

John Kirwan, Terry Wright, John Schuster, Bernie McCahill, Zinzan and Marty Brooke (Robin may still have been playing Under 21s then)

Steve Pokere and Steve McDowell for Pakuranga.

In 1986 they introduced the early season South Pacific championship (the first initial step towards today's Super XV), and it all started to change, and time to play club rugby diminished for rep players and All Blacks. But I can still remember as clear as day, standing a few feet from Steve McDowell as he was chatting to someone after coming off Eden Park No. 2 - no mobs, no autograph hunters, no TV cameras. He was a potential All Black with a big future, had just arrived up from the BOP (Auckland had business connections in those shamateur days, and the provinces were going into the rural down-turn courtesy of Roger Douglas' economic reforms).

One of my club mates still laughs about the time he was doing primitive video spy coverage, running up and down the sideline between the No. 2 and 3 fields at Eden Park filming Varsity, coached then by Ted Henry. Heny assumed he was the Varsity video man, rather than from Ponies, and was giving him a running commentary on where to pan in, and all the inside information and codes and moves he needed to make sure he was capturing. Can you imagine a coup like that happening in the professional era! :)

...and I forgot - such was the depth of midfield talent in Auckland at the time

(All Blacks Joe Stanley and Steve Pokere, future All Blacks Schuster and McCahill, future Samoan international To'o Vaega at Suburbs, the great Ponies stalwarts Levi Va'o and Herati Matipo who both played for Auckland and test rugby for their Pacific Islands of origin, future Kiwi League international Kurt Sherlock, or the great New Zealand long jump Olympic gold medalist, Yvette Williams' son Peter Corlett at Pakuranga),

...no one really noticed Frank Bunce plugging away for lowly Manukau!

August 8, 2013 at 2:43 AM Flag Quote & Reply

All Blacks 1996
Member
Posts: 160

Kimbo I find it very saddening to read your last few posts. You describe the treasures of our once great nation, their abundance, and how much we have lost. How much has been plundered, and that the most kiwis are not aware or do not even care. 

I cannot help but feel our generation is to blame for selling our heritage to SkyTV rather than keeping it for the grandchildren to play. Now we get State of stupid Ozzygin. What a tragedy.

August 8, 2013 at 4:56 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Flourbomber
Member
Posts: 104

All Blacks 1996 at August 8, 2013 at 4:56 AM

Kimbo I find it very saddening to read your last few posts. You describe the treasures of our once great nation, their abundance, and how much we have lost. How much has been plundered, and that the most kiwis are not aware or do not even care. 

I cannot help but feel our generation is to blame for selling our heritage to SkyTV rather than keeping it for the grandchildren to play. Now we get State of stupid Ozzygin. What a tragedy.

Bring back tours - it is a professional game after all.

Kick off test matches at 3 pm - night rugby it is just not the same - it is always too wet fr a start.

And only citizens can play international rugby

 

August 8, 2013 at 5:48 AM Flag Quote & Reply

All Blacks 1996
Member
Posts: 160

At last we agree, but I fear the problems run deeper than that. We might need a civil war to fix these problems.

August 8, 2013 at 5:53 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Flourbomber
Member
Posts: 104

and we can get rid of "Super" rugby ?- lets bring back the NPC - and let NSW, Melborne, Brumbies and Qld as well as Fiji, Samoa and Tonga play - the Force can play Currie Cup. But only NZ teams can play for the Ranfurly Shield.

One more thing - Rugby is a winter game - so the season starts in April. 

August 8, 2013 at 5:55 AM Flag Quote & Reply

All Blacks 1996
Member
Posts: 160

I have no interest in playing sport with australians, they are genocidal racists.

I will start a new thread get rid of "Super" rugby ?

August 8, 2013 at 6:03 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Kimbo
Member
Posts: 219

he he he - this website is turning into the "Land of the Dinosaurs"!

While part of me agrees with the sentiments, professional rugby is a necessity to keep the players from going t oEurope, Japan, or League. Playing midweek fixtures against West Coast-Buller, Boland, or Ulster will never pay the bills.

New Zealand may be a super-power in terms of rugby talent, but with only 4 million people we cannot generate enough TV revenue from within the country alone to fund our own game. Hence the TV audiences of Asutralia and South Africa.

I'd also suggest we have failed to tap into the wonderful potential that is Japan (roughly the same time zone). Perhaps after they host the 2019 RWC...

The financial problems of the provincial unions in the New Zealand ITM Cup show that even that cannot sustain full professionalism. Instead, it has to function, like the minor leagues in American baseball, or American college football, as a pro-am feeder for the next tier.

Sorry lads - I'd love to watch the Springboks do an old-fashioned tour of New Zealand or vice versa like the good old days- and rugby, like cricket has really lost something special and unique with the passing of the thrre match 25 game tour. However, I see no practical way, other than the 4 year cycle the Lions function on, to make it work financially...

One thing I do passionately agree on - DON'T FOOL AROUND WITH THE RANFURLY SHIELD!! I still regard it as the premier trophy New Zealand non-international teams compete for, even ahead of the Super XV. It has a magic about it (other than in Auckland - although ironically they usually win it regularly, and their 1985-93 tenure was the greatest and will likely never be beaten).

To be in a New Zealand town or province when you win the 'Log of Wood' is one of the unique energising experiences that can occur in a community. Sheer magic - even in the days of professionalism.

August 8, 2013 at 6:13 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Scud
Member
Posts: 26

Interesting reading on here. In terms of bringing back tours - sadly, those days are long gone. The teams the All Blacks used to play on tours don't even exist anymore. Those Welsh clubs the ABs used to play are now amateur clubs that pretty much just play at regular club level now; and their games are not even first class anymore. The same for the English teams: London Division, Midlands and the Scotish Borders etc. they all don't exist anymore. If there were tours, it would be a waste of time as the couch would put all his test team in cotton wool  for the test matches and play a 'B' team in all the other games. You pretty much get two different teams, much like the All Blacks who toured South Africa in 1996. It would never be the same!

--
August 8, 2013 at 6:46 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Kimbo
Member
Posts: 219

Scud at August 8, 2013 at 6:46 AM

Interesting reading on here. In terms of bringing back tours - sadly, those days are long gone. The teams the All Blacks used to play on tours don't even exist anymore. Those Welsh clubs the ABs used to play are now amateur clubs that pretty much just play at regular club level now; and their games are not even first class anymore. The same for the English teams: London Division, Midlands and the Scotish Borders etc. they all don't exist anymore. If there were tours, it would be a waste of time as the couch would put all his test team in cotton wool  for the test matches and play a 'B' team in all the other games. You pretty much get two different teams, much like the All Blacks who toured South Africa in 1996. It would never be the same!

Yep.

Sad, but true. The players on a three month tour would become like movie star celebrities, and you knew all this stuff about them that would be published in the papers, or in the tour books afterwards, e.g.

Bruce Hay of the Boroughmuir club in Edinburgh was an electrician

August 8, 2013 at 7:28 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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